A Twist On Being Important

All of us want to know we are important and all of us want to feel we are making a contribution to the world.
This concept of wanting to be important has been around forever.
It made Abraham Lincoln study law.
It made Charles Dickens write his immortal novels.
Being important and making a difference is something many of us wrestle with.

What would happen if we turned this wanting into a giving.

What would happen if we stopped thinking and started thanking.

So lets try A Twist On Wanting To Be Important.

How about we start praising others for their accomplishments!
 
How about we start complimenting others for their contributions!
 
How about we start demonstrating our happiness for others results!
 
How about we let others in our lives know that who they are and what they are doing is important!

And how about we truly start appreciating them from our heart.

Emerson said, Every man I meet is my superior in some way, in that, I learn from him.

Lead From Within: Who can you reach out to and let them know they are important!


Lolly Daskal is one of the most sought-after executive leadership coaches in the world. Her extensive cross-cultural expertise spans 14 countries, six languages and hundreds of companies. As founder and CEO of Lead From Within, her proprietary leadership program is engineered to be a catalyst for leaders who want to enhance performance and make a meaningful difference in their companies, their lives, and the world.

Of Lolly’s many awards and accolades, Lolly was designated a Top-50 Leadership and Management Expert by Inc. magazine. Huffington Post honored Lolly with the title of The Most Inspiring Woman in the World. Her writing has appeared in HBR, Inc.com, Fast Company (Ask The Expert), Huffington Post, and Psychology Today, and others. Her newest book, The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness has become a national bestseller.

8 Responses to “A Twist On Being Important”

  1. Declan Dunn

    09. May, 2011

    Nice twist on the question Lolly, when we focus on others in a spirit of thankfulness and gratitude, things shift inside…and this connection is really why “you are important”, because we are all so connected.

    One inspiration from your post for me; do you praise yourself for your accomplishments, compliment yourself, and demonstrate happiness for your own results?

    Sounds odd, in my mentoring most of my clients, and myself, have the hardest time recognizing our own achievements, thanking ourselves, and being grateful.

    what you share with others you should share with yourself…not in a dance of how great I am, in simple recognition of your core excellence, your core gifts…it’s usually hardest to be nice to you…

    because you are important, and while others may think this, you must feel it – I struggle with this myself, being harder on me than I am on others, which is something your post stirred up…as usual, thank you!

    Reply to this comment
  2. lollydaskal

    09. May, 2011

    Thank you Declan –For your wonderful thoughts and insight.
    Yes appreciating yourself is important. This post was for those who are feeling stuck- depressed-pressured.
    stuck that they are not making a difference
    depressed that they are not important.
    pressured that their life is passing them by.
    so my motto is…
    If we give
    if we share
    if we compliment
    if we are thankful
    we get more
    we receive more
    we have more to be grateful for.

    Blessings
    Lolly

    Reply to this comment
  3. J.J.Brown

    09. May, 2011

    Hi Lolly, thank you for this encouraging piece. I just joined twitter this year, and one of the things that attracted me to your twitter stream was how on follow Fridays you note why you follow each person you name, what you truely appreciate about them. This gave a whole new meaning to the #FF activity for me. As a scientist author, I’m well set in one area, science, but completely new to fiction publishing which is a love of mine. When I see another new author publish her first book,a few this year, the happiness it gives me is a great experience, and also gives me hope. -J.J.Brown

    Reply to this comment
    • lollydaskal

      09. May, 2011

      J.J.
      Having you part of LFW family is important to us. Your insights. Your wisdom teaches us something new every week.
      You are important to us.

      Looking forward to reading your book.

      Blessings
      Lolly

      Reply to this comment
  4. Gwyn Teatro

    09. May, 2011

    Lolly, this reminds me of a little plaque I saw once in a local pub in England. it said, simply: “It’s nice to be important but more important to be nice”
    While “nice” to some people, can be a bit insipid a word, I think it means just what you are saying here. Being “nice” means taking the light away from our own head and shining it elsewhere so others can feel how much they matter.

    Reply to this comment
    • lollydaskal

      09. May, 2011

      Gwyn,

      I LOVE this: “It’s nice to be important but more important to be nice” It adds a real thoughtful touch to the blog post.
      You are amazing. Thank you for being you. You are important to me and to the LFW family #leadfromwithin
      Blessings
      Lolly

      Reply to this comment
  5. Kathy Manweiler

    11. May, 2011

    Thanks for the inspiration this morning, Lolly! This is great stuff.

    As I was reading, it struck me that by encouraging and praising others, we truly are making a contribution to the world because we’re spreading kindness, appreciation and love. Most of us probably have bigger dreams of how we want to contribute to the world, but you’ve just given us things that we can do TODAY to make a difference in people’s lives.

    Thank you so much, @kamkansas

    Reply to this comment
    • lollydaskal

      11. May, 2011

      Kathy,
      What we do TODAY….Creates a blueprint for our tomorrows and our tomorrows define our life.
      Our life defines the difference we make in the world.
      Blessings
      Lolly

      Reply to this comment

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